Sport und soziale Medien: Eine multimethodische Betrachtung des Zusammenhangs zwischen medialen und sportlichen Freizeitaktivitäten und der Bedeutung des sportbezogenen Handelns in sozialen Netzwerken für das Sporttreiben und sportive Identität(en) in der Adoleszenz

Translated title of the contribution: Sport and Social Media: A multimethod approach towards the relation between sports activities and media use and the relevance of sport-related behaviour in virtual social networks for sport activities and sporty identities in adolescence.

Publication: Book/ReportDissertations

Abstract

Ongoing mediatization processes lead to changes in daily life, culture and society in postmodern civilizations that shape new conditions for growing up (Krotz, 2017). Social media has evolved into an integral part of the youth, which impacts the social life and leisure patterns of adolescents. The increase of social media related activities and the focus on virtual realities are often outlined as an opposite pole to exercise, sport and social embedding. But at the same time social media offers an abundance of sport-related self-presentations, fitness programs, training plans and discussion forums that promote sporty and healthy lifestyles. These contrasting perspectives raise the questions to what extent growing up in mediatized social worlds influence the sport activities of adolescents and if social media holds conducive or obstructive potentials for sport participation. Referring to the theory of mediatization (Krotz, 2017, 2008; Hepp, 2013) and the interactional concept of socialization by Hurrelmann (2012, 2002), this work focuses on three related research questions: (1) Which aspects influence the amount of time adolescents spend in using the internet and doing sport and how do these two leisure activities affect each other? (2) Which social, personal and medial resources determine socialization processes into club-based or informal sport settings of adolescents and young grown-ups? (3) In which ways does sport-related behaviour in virtual social networks affect the sport activities and the development of sporty identities of young grown-ups? Different methodical approaches were carried out in order to get comprehensive and sophisticated insights: two quantitative secondary data analyses using linear and binary regression models were complemented with a qualitative interview survey.
To sum up, it can be said that the empirical studies provide a deeper understanding of adolescent environments as well as differentiated insights into the complex interplay of sport- and media-related leisure activities of adolescents and young grown-ups in Germany. Results indicate positive effects of media activities on sport as well as a small potential of sport to reduce the internet use of adolescents. Girls and young women are more likely to gain positive impulses for their sport activities by using social media, e.g. by gaining knowledge and motivation or by getting information and contacts. According to the empirical findings the cultural pessimistic thesis that social media activities displace sport activities (Zuzanek, 2016) as well as the negative connotation on social media should be replaced by new approaches that emphasis beneficial potentials of social media on sport. Furthermore the studies suggest practical implications, e.g. improving social media presences of sport clubs and sport associations or establishing high quality platforms for sport- and training-related information and support.
Translated title of the contributionSport and Social Media: A multimethod approach towards the relation between sports activities and media use and the relevance of sport-related behaviour in virtual social networks for sport activities and sporty identities in adolescence.
Original languageGerman
Place of PublicationKöln
PublisherDeutsche Sporthochschule Köln
Number of pages174
Publication statusPublished - 2017

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Sport and Social Media: A multimethod approach towards the relation between sports activities and media use and the relevance of sport-related behaviour in virtual social networks for sport activities and sporty identities in adolescence.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Citation