About exercise recommendations to relax your brain

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About exercise recommendations to relax your brain. / Abeln, Vera; Klein, Timo; Peter-Krull, Julia; Schneider, Stefan.

in: Medicine and science in sports and exercise, Jahrgang 48, Nr. Supplement 1-5, 2150, 31.05.2016, S. 607.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftKonferenz-Abstract in FachzeitschriftForschungBegutachtung

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@article{b70799b3dad848b9a8f5ba821bd9b1e0,
title = "About exercise recommendations to relax your brain",
abstract = "In todays popula&on stress and psychological diseases are on the rise. To support mental health, exercises should be recommended which reduce electrocor&cal arousal especially within the prefrontal cortex (execu&ve func&ons). Because a decrease of prefrontal brain cor&cal ac&vity was revealed following running exercise in runners but not bicycling, armcranking or isometric strength exercise (Br{\"u}mmer et al. 2011), it was hypothesized that exercise preference, adapta&on or running characteris&cs might play a role for the post-exercise effect on brain cor&cal ac&vity. PURPOSE: The present study aimed to check the preference/adapta&on hypothesis by tes&ng a group of triathletes, who are adapted to both running and bicycling, but who prefer one of the two exercises. A group of hockey players running but during a compe&&ve match will confine the effect of running characteris&cs. METHODS: 10 professional triathletes were asked to perform two modes of triathlon (bicycling and running), each at their individual self-chosen intensity under field condi&ons (STUDY TRIATHLETES). 24 professional hockey players (n=12 ac&ve, n=12 passive) were tested during a compe&&ve match (STUDY HOCKEY). Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded under rest condi&ons before (PRE) and ader (POST) exercise. Low-resolu&on brain electromagne&c tomography (LORETA) was applied to localize current density (μV2/mm4) of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe. RESULTS: In triathletes, brain cor&cal ac&vity decreased following running exercise within the frontal (p< .001) lobe. No differences were found for bicycling exercise. Comparing the trials of the preferred with non-preferred mode revealed no difference for all regions of interest (frontal p= .943, occipital p= .438, parietal p= .987, temporal p= .664). In hockey players, no significant differences between PRE and POST brain cor&cal ac&vity and between ac&ve and passive players were found. CONCLUSION: The triathlete study supports that the effect of exercise on brain cor&cal ac&vity is not dependent on adapta&on but running itself. The exercise preference hypothesis could not be confirmed. The hockey data suggests that steady rather than interval running is making the difference. Steady running should be recommended to support mental health. Further studies are required for verifica&on.",
author = "Vera Abeln and Timo Klein and Julia Peter-Krull and Stefan Schneider",
note = "ACSM's 63rd Annual Meeting 7th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine and World Congress on the Basic Science of Energy Balance, May 31 - June 04, 2016 Boston, Massachusetts",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "31",
language = "English",
volume = "48",
pages = "607",
journal = "Medicine and science in sports and exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "Supplement 1-5",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - About exercise recommendations to relax your brain

AU - Abeln, Vera

AU - Klein, Timo

AU - Peter-Krull, Julia

AU - Schneider, Stefan

N1 - ACSM's 63rd Annual Meeting 7th World Congress on Exercise is Medicine and World Congress on the Basic Science of Energy Balance, May 31 - June 04, 2016 Boston, Massachusetts

PY - 2016/5/31

Y1 - 2016/5/31

N2 - In todays popula&on stress and psychological diseases are on the rise. To support mental health, exercises should be recommended which reduce electrocor&cal arousal especially within the prefrontal cortex (execu&ve func&ons). Because a decrease of prefrontal brain cor&cal ac&vity was revealed following running exercise in runners but not bicycling, armcranking or isometric strength exercise (Brümmer et al. 2011), it was hypothesized that exercise preference, adapta&on or running characteris&cs might play a role for the post-exercise effect on brain cor&cal ac&vity. PURPOSE: The present study aimed to check the preference/adapta&on hypothesis by tes&ng a group of triathletes, who are adapted to both running and bicycling, but who prefer one of the two exercises. A group of hockey players running but during a compe&&ve match will confine the effect of running characteris&cs. METHODS: 10 professional triathletes were asked to perform two modes of triathlon (bicycling and running), each at their individual self-chosen intensity under field condi&ons (STUDY TRIATHLETES). 24 professional hockey players (n=12 ac&ve, n=12 passive) were tested during a compe&&ve match (STUDY HOCKEY). Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded under rest condi&ons before (PRE) and ader (POST) exercise. Low-resolu&on brain electromagne&c tomography (LORETA) was applied to localize current density (μV2/mm4) of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe. RESULTS: In triathletes, brain cor&cal ac&vity decreased following running exercise within the frontal (p< .001) lobe. No differences were found for bicycling exercise. Comparing the trials of the preferred with non-preferred mode revealed no difference for all regions of interest (frontal p= .943, occipital p= .438, parietal p= .987, temporal p= .664). In hockey players, no significant differences between PRE and POST brain cor&cal ac&vity and between ac&ve and passive players were found. CONCLUSION: The triathlete study supports that the effect of exercise on brain cor&cal ac&vity is not dependent on adapta&on but running itself. The exercise preference hypothesis could not be confirmed. The hockey data suggests that steady rather than interval running is making the difference. Steady running should be recommended to support mental health. Further studies are required for verifica&on.

AB - In todays popula&on stress and psychological diseases are on the rise. To support mental health, exercises should be recommended which reduce electrocor&cal arousal especially within the prefrontal cortex (execu&ve func&ons). Because a decrease of prefrontal brain cor&cal ac&vity was revealed following running exercise in runners but not bicycling, armcranking or isometric strength exercise (Brümmer et al. 2011), it was hypothesized that exercise preference, adapta&on or running characteris&cs might play a role for the post-exercise effect on brain cor&cal ac&vity. PURPOSE: The present study aimed to check the preference/adapta&on hypothesis by tes&ng a group of triathletes, who are adapted to both running and bicycling, but who prefer one of the two exercises. A group of hockey players running but during a compe&&ve match will confine the effect of running characteris&cs. METHODS: 10 professional triathletes were asked to perform two modes of triathlon (bicycling and running), each at their individual self-chosen intensity under field condi&ons (STUDY TRIATHLETES). 24 professional hockey players (n=12 ac&ve, n=12 passive) were tested during a compe&&ve match (STUDY HOCKEY). Electroencephalography (EEG) was recorded under rest condi&ons before (PRE) and ader (POST) exercise. Low-resolu&on brain electromagne&c tomography (LORETA) was applied to localize current density (μV2/mm4) of the frontal, parietal, occipital and temporal lobe. RESULTS: In triathletes, brain cor&cal ac&vity decreased following running exercise within the frontal (p< .001) lobe. No differences were found for bicycling exercise. Comparing the trials of the preferred with non-preferred mode revealed no difference for all regions of interest (frontal p= .943, occipital p= .438, parietal p= .987, temporal p= .664). In hockey players, no significant differences between PRE and POST brain cor&cal ac&vity and between ac&ve and passive players were found. CONCLUSION: The triathlete study supports that the effect of exercise on brain cor&cal ac&vity is not dependent on adapta&on but running itself. The exercise preference hypothesis could not be confirmed. The hockey data suggests that steady rather than interval running is making the difference. Steady running should be recommended to support mental health. Further studies are required for verifica&on.

M3 - Conference abstract in journal

VL - 48

SP - 607

JO - Medicine and science in sports and exercise

JF - Medicine and science in sports and exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - Supplement 1-5

M1 - 2150

ER -

ID: 3179249