Acceleration effects on manual performance with isometric and displacement joysticks

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Acceleration effects on manual performance with isometric and displacement joysticks. / Guardiera, Simon; Bock, Otmar Leo; Pongratz, Hans; Krause, Wolfgang.

in: Aviation, space, and environmental medicine, Jahrgang 78, Nr. 10, 01.10.2007, S. 990-994.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschung

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@article{9a151849e1ea4cf98c7956b7bed11b6c,
title = "Acceleration effects on manual performance with isometric and displacement joysticks",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: We have shown before that novice human subjects produce exaggerated isometric forces when exposed to three times normal terrestrial acceleration (+3 Gz), and that this deficit is compensated by intensive training in +3 Gz. We now investigate whether training in normal terrestrial gravity (normal G) is also effective. We further examine whether subjects in +3 Gz produce not only exaggerated forces, but also exaggerated hand displacements.METHODS: Experiments were conducted in the stationary (normal G) or rotating (+3 Gz) gondola of a man-rated centrifuge. With their dominant hand, subjects produced either forces using an isometric joystick, or hand displacements using a regular joystick. Response directions and magnitudes were prescribed visually. In practice trials, subjects received continuous visual feedback about their performance, while in test trials they did not.RESULTS: Subjects produced exaggerated forces in +3 Gz, whether or not they previously practiced the task in normal G. In contrast, subjects did not produce exaggerated hand displacements in +3 Gz.DISCUSSION: Exaggerated force production in +3 Gz is not overcome by task practice in normal G, as opposed to task practice in +3 Gz. This might be an indication that pilot training should contain extended practice of force production during phases of increased gravity (+Gz) to avoid motor deficits during flight maneuvers inducing +Gz. Furthermore, the control of isometric and regular joysticks seems to be based on partly distinct neural mechanisms, with different +Gz dependence. Thus, against the background of motor performance during +Gz, regular sticks might be favorably compared to isometric sticks in high-performance aircrafts.",
keywords = "Acceleration, Adaptation, Physiological, Adult, Aerospace Medicine, Aircraft, Analysis of Variance, Centrifugation, Hand Strength, Humans, Hypergravity, Isometric Contraction, Psychomotor Performance",
author = "Simon Guardiera and Bock, {Otmar Leo} and Hans Pongratz and Wolfgang Krause",
year = "2007",
month = oct,
day = "1",
language = "English",
volume = "78",
pages = "990--994",
journal = "Aviation, space, and environmental medicine",
issn = "0095-6562",
publisher = "Aerospace Medical Association",
number = "10",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Acceleration effects on manual performance with isometric and displacement joysticks

AU - Guardiera, Simon

AU - Bock, Otmar Leo

AU - Pongratz, Hans

AU - Krause, Wolfgang

PY - 2007/10/1

Y1 - 2007/10/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: We have shown before that novice human subjects produce exaggerated isometric forces when exposed to three times normal terrestrial acceleration (+3 Gz), and that this deficit is compensated by intensive training in +3 Gz. We now investigate whether training in normal terrestrial gravity (normal G) is also effective. We further examine whether subjects in +3 Gz produce not only exaggerated forces, but also exaggerated hand displacements.METHODS: Experiments were conducted in the stationary (normal G) or rotating (+3 Gz) gondola of a man-rated centrifuge. With their dominant hand, subjects produced either forces using an isometric joystick, or hand displacements using a regular joystick. Response directions and magnitudes were prescribed visually. In practice trials, subjects received continuous visual feedback about their performance, while in test trials they did not.RESULTS: Subjects produced exaggerated forces in +3 Gz, whether or not they previously practiced the task in normal G. In contrast, subjects did not produce exaggerated hand displacements in +3 Gz.DISCUSSION: Exaggerated force production in +3 Gz is not overcome by task practice in normal G, as opposed to task practice in +3 Gz. This might be an indication that pilot training should contain extended practice of force production during phases of increased gravity (+Gz) to avoid motor deficits during flight maneuvers inducing +Gz. Furthermore, the control of isometric and regular joysticks seems to be based on partly distinct neural mechanisms, with different +Gz dependence. Thus, against the background of motor performance during +Gz, regular sticks might be favorably compared to isometric sticks in high-performance aircrafts.

AB - BACKGROUND: We have shown before that novice human subjects produce exaggerated isometric forces when exposed to three times normal terrestrial acceleration (+3 Gz), and that this deficit is compensated by intensive training in +3 Gz. We now investigate whether training in normal terrestrial gravity (normal G) is also effective. We further examine whether subjects in +3 Gz produce not only exaggerated forces, but also exaggerated hand displacements.METHODS: Experiments were conducted in the stationary (normal G) or rotating (+3 Gz) gondola of a man-rated centrifuge. With their dominant hand, subjects produced either forces using an isometric joystick, or hand displacements using a regular joystick. Response directions and magnitudes were prescribed visually. In practice trials, subjects received continuous visual feedback about their performance, while in test trials they did not.RESULTS: Subjects produced exaggerated forces in +3 Gz, whether or not they previously practiced the task in normal G. In contrast, subjects did not produce exaggerated hand displacements in +3 Gz.DISCUSSION: Exaggerated force production in +3 Gz is not overcome by task practice in normal G, as opposed to task practice in +3 Gz. This might be an indication that pilot training should contain extended practice of force production during phases of increased gravity (+Gz) to avoid motor deficits during flight maneuvers inducing +Gz. Furthermore, the control of isometric and regular joysticks seems to be based on partly distinct neural mechanisms, with different +Gz dependence. Thus, against the background of motor performance during +Gz, regular sticks might be favorably compared to isometric sticks in high-performance aircrafts.

KW - Acceleration

KW - Adaptation, Physiological

KW - Adult

KW - Aerospace Medicine

KW - Aircraft

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Centrifugation

KW - Hand Strength

KW - Humans

KW - Hypergravity

KW - Isometric Contraction

KW - Psychomotor Performance

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 17955950

VL - 78

SP - 990

EP - 994

JO - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine

JF - Aviation, space, and environmental medicine

SN - 0095-6562

IS - 10

ER -

ID: 162901