ALTERATIONS IN ACID-BASE BALANCE UNDER HYPOXIC CONDITIONS AND RESULTING IMPLICATIONS FOR ANAEROBIC EXERCISE PERFORMANCE AT ALTITUDE: A RETROSPECTIVE ANALYSIS

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Introduction: Sport competitions and mountaineering disciplines
with high anaerobic demands are performed at altitude.
Hypoxia-induced respiratory alkalosis results in
declined blood [HCO3
-] and blood buffer capacity. However
rarely been described, this decline is suggested to affect anaerobic
exercise performance. Therefore, this study aimed to
show changes in acid-base balance in hypoxia and its implications
on anaerobic performance.
Methods: Data of publicly-available datasets of blood gas
analyses and anaerobic portable-tethered-sprint-running
(PTSR) tests were analyzed (A) for changes in acid-base
balance after 12 h of hypoxic exposure and relationship between
night-/day-time exposure (n = 56). Additionally (B),
hypoxia-induced anaerobic performance impairments were
assessed (n = 52). Interactions between acid-base balance and
the PTSR-outputs mean force (MF), peak force (PF), fatigue
index (FI), maximum blood lactate (La), and maximum heart
rate (HR) were analyzed.
Results: (A) 12 h of hypoxia reduced PO2, PCO2, [HCO3
-],
and saO2, and increased pH. Hypoxia reduced [HCO3
-] and
increased pH less pronounced during night-time compared to
day-time (p £ 0.05). (B) Hypoxia affected the PTSR-related
parameters PF, MF, and La negatively (p £ 0.05), but not FI
and HR. Multiple-regression analysis indicated an influence
of the hypoxia-induced increase in pH on the associated
change in FI (p = 0.002).
Conclusion: The results show a significant reduction in
[HCO3
-] and a maintained increase in pH after 12 h of
hypoxia indicating an uncompensated respiratory alkalosis.
There was a reduction of anaerobic performance in
hypoxia and our data suggest that the higher the pH, the
higher the rate of fatigue during continuous high-intensity
exercise.
OriginalspracheEnglisch
TitelAbstracts - XIII ISMM World Congress on Mountain Medicine 2021
Erscheinungsdatum2021
PublikationsstatusVeröffentlicht - 2021

ID: 6749458

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