Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball

Publikationen: Beitrag in Buch/Bericht/KonferenzbandKonferenzbeitrag - Abstract in KonferenzbandForschungBegutachtung

Standard

Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball. / Meyer, Johannes; Smeeton, Nicholas J.; Fasold, Frowin et al.

9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts. 2021. S. 5.

Publikationen: Beitrag in Buch/Bericht/KonferenzbandKonferenzbeitrag - Abstract in KonferenzbandForschungBegutachtung

Harvard

Meyer, J, Smeeton, NJ, Fasold, F, Schul, K & Klatt, S 2021, Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball. in 9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts. S. 5, Meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network, Online, 12.05.21.

APA

Meyer, J., Smeeton, N. J., Fasold, F., Schul, K., & Klatt, S. (2021). Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball. in 9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts (S. 5)

Vancouver

Meyer J, Smeeton NJ, Fasold F, Schul K, Klatt S. Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball. in 9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts. 2021. S. 5

Bibtex

@inbook{30d38fddb78f4263bd2cfcc8ef5b4c5f,
title = "Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball",
abstract = "The aim of the study was to examine sources of information for predicting shooting behaviour in basketball players. Using a representative research design, 31 (15 national level experts, 16 novices) participants watched life-sized videos of basketball players performing shots or shot fakes. Shooting actions were temporally occluded at one of three events; gaze orientation to basket, ball at head height, shot initiation. Participants decided if the shooting motion was a shot or fake by activating response switches with a game-like motions. Accuracy, response time, and confidence were recorded along with gaze behaviour. The results showed an interaction between shot fake and occlusion event, indicating that later occlusion of a normal shooting motion increased the probability of a shot deceiving a defender. In comparison to novices, experts were affected by this interaction with a delay. In contrary to the accuracy, the confidence in giving the correct answer increased with later occlusion. Further, eye gaze was located at the hips for longer in experts when shots were accurately anticipated. Our results suggest that direction of a defender{\textquoteright}s attention towards to the shooter{\textquoteright}s hips to may help the anticipation of genuine and fake shots.",
author = "Johannes Meyer and Smeeton, {Nicholas J.} and Frowin Fasold and Karsten Schul and Stefanie Klatt",
year = "2021",
month = may,
day = "12",
language = "English",
pages = "5",
booktitle = "9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts",
note = "null ; Conference date: 12-05-2021 Through 12-05-2021",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Anticipation and gaze behaviour when defending shots in Basketball

AU - Meyer, Johannes

AU - Smeeton, Nicholas J.

AU - Fasold, Frowin

AU - Schul, Karsten

AU - Klatt, Stefanie

N1 - Conference code: 9

PY - 2021/5/12

Y1 - 2021/5/12

N2 - The aim of the study was to examine sources of information for predicting shooting behaviour in basketball players. Using a representative research design, 31 (15 national level experts, 16 novices) participants watched life-sized videos of basketball players performing shots or shot fakes. Shooting actions were temporally occluded at one of three events; gaze orientation to basket, ball at head height, shot initiation. Participants decided if the shooting motion was a shot or fake by activating response switches with a game-like motions. Accuracy, response time, and confidence were recorded along with gaze behaviour. The results showed an interaction between shot fake and occlusion event, indicating that later occlusion of a normal shooting motion increased the probability of a shot deceiving a defender. In comparison to novices, experts were affected by this interaction with a delay. In contrary to the accuracy, the confidence in giving the correct answer increased with later occlusion. Further, eye gaze was located at the hips for longer in experts when shots were accurately anticipated. Our results suggest that direction of a defender’s attention towards to the shooter’s hips to may help the anticipation of genuine and fake shots.

AB - The aim of the study was to examine sources of information for predicting shooting behaviour in basketball players. Using a representative research design, 31 (15 national level experts, 16 novices) participants watched life-sized videos of basketball players performing shots or shot fakes. Shooting actions were temporally occluded at one of three events; gaze orientation to basket, ball at head height, shot initiation. Participants decided if the shooting motion was a shot or fake by activating response switches with a game-like motions. Accuracy, response time, and confidence were recorded along with gaze behaviour. The results showed an interaction between shot fake and occlusion event, indicating that later occlusion of a normal shooting motion increased the probability of a shot deceiving a defender. In comparison to novices, experts were affected by this interaction with a delay. In contrary to the accuracy, the confidence in giving the correct answer increased with later occlusion. Further, eye gaze was located at the hips for longer in experts when shots were accurately anticipated. Our results suggest that direction of a defender’s attention towards to the shooter’s hips to may help the anticipation of genuine and fake shots.

UR - https://www.esan-network.co.uk/uploads/1/2/2/3/122302783/9th_esan_conference__2021_-_book_of_abstracts.pdf

M3 - Conference contribution - Published abstract for conference with selection process

SP - 5

BT - 9th meeting of the Expertise and Skill Acquisition Network - Book of Abstracts

Y2 - 12 May 2021 through 12 May 2021

ER -

ID: 6579543