Effects of pump speed changes on exercise capacity in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device - an overview

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungBegutachtung

Standard

Effects of pump speed changes on exercise capacity in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device - an overview. / Schmidt, Thomas; Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna; Schulte-Eistrup, Sebastian; Reiss, Nils.

in: Journal of thoracic disease, Jahrgang 10, Nr. Suppl. 15, 06.2018, S. S1802-S1810.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungBegutachtung

Harvard

APA

Vancouver

Bibtex

@article{c5ef00eb4d564d839e6849dacaa30d6f,
title = "Effects of pump speed changes on exercise capacity in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device - an overview",
abstract = "The implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has been established as a successful treatment for terminal heart failure (HF) for many years. Patient benefits include significantly improved survival, as well as improved quality of life. However, peak exercise capacity following LVAD implantation remains considerably restricted. This could be due to the predominate use of continuous-flow pumps, which operate at a fixed rotational speed and do not adapt to exercise conditions. Therefore, current research is focused on whether, and to what extent, adaptations in pump speed can influence and improve patient exercise capacity. We performed a systematic PubMed literature search on this topic, and found 11 relevant studies with 161 patients. Exercise time, peak work load, total cardiac output (TCO), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and, if available, values at the anaerobic threshold (AT) were all taken into consideration. Possible complications were documented. This paper aims to compare the results from these studies in order to discuss the effects of pump speed adaptations on exercise capacity.",
keywords = "Journal Article, Review",
author = "Thomas Schmidt and Birna Bjarnason-Wehrens and Sebastian Schulte-Eistrup and Nils Reiss",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
doi = "10.21037/jtd.2018.01.114",
language = "English",
volume = "10",
pages = "S1802--S1810",
journal = "Journal of thoracic disease",
issn = "2072-1439",
publisher = "Pioneer Bioscience Publishing Company (PBPC)",
number = "Suppl. 15",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of pump speed changes on exercise capacity in patients supported with a left ventricular assist device - an overview

AU - Schmidt, Thomas

AU - Bjarnason-Wehrens, Birna

AU - Schulte-Eistrup, Sebastian

AU - Reiss, Nils

PY - 2018/6

Y1 - 2018/6

N2 - The implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has been established as a successful treatment for terminal heart failure (HF) for many years. Patient benefits include significantly improved survival, as well as improved quality of life. However, peak exercise capacity following LVAD implantation remains considerably restricted. This could be due to the predominate use of continuous-flow pumps, which operate at a fixed rotational speed and do not adapt to exercise conditions. Therefore, current research is focused on whether, and to what extent, adaptations in pump speed can influence and improve patient exercise capacity. We performed a systematic PubMed literature search on this topic, and found 11 relevant studies with 161 patients. Exercise time, peak work load, total cardiac output (TCO), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and, if available, values at the anaerobic threshold (AT) were all taken into consideration. Possible complications were documented. This paper aims to compare the results from these studies in order to discuss the effects of pump speed adaptations on exercise capacity.

AB - The implantation of left ventricular assist devices (LVAD) has been established as a successful treatment for terminal heart failure (HF) for many years. Patient benefits include significantly improved survival, as well as improved quality of life. However, peak exercise capacity following LVAD implantation remains considerably restricted. This could be due to the predominate use of continuous-flow pumps, which operate at a fixed rotational speed and do not adapt to exercise conditions. Therefore, current research is focused on whether, and to what extent, adaptations in pump speed can influence and improve patient exercise capacity. We performed a systematic PubMed literature search on this topic, and found 11 relevant studies with 161 patients. Exercise time, peak work load, total cardiac output (TCO), peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2) and, if available, values at the anaerobic threshold (AT) were all taken into consideration. Possible complications were documented. This paper aims to compare the results from these studies in order to discuss the effects of pump speed adaptations on exercise capacity.

KW - Journal Article

KW - Review

U2 - 10.21037/jtd.2018.01.114

DO - 10.21037/jtd.2018.01.114

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 10

SP - S1802-S1810

JO - Journal of thoracic disease

JF - Journal of thoracic disease

SN - 2072-1439

IS - Suppl. 15

ER -

ID: 3632467