Long jumpers with and without a transtibial amputation have different three-dimensional centre of mass and joint take-off step kinematics

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Long jumpers with and without a transtibial amputation have different three-dimensional centre of mass and joint take-off step kinematics. / Funken, Johannes; Willwacher, Steffen; Heinrich, Kai; Müller, Ralf; Hobara, Hiroaki; Grabowski, Alena M; Potthast, Wolfgang.

in: Royal Society open Science, Jahrgang 6, Nr. 4, 190107, 01.04.2019.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungBegutachtung

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@article{27c9b8afbe0d439c91e5b0000a8c1002,
title = "Long jumpers with and without a transtibial amputation have different three-dimensional centre of mass and joint take-off step kinematics",
abstract = "Long jumpers with below the knee amputation (BKA) have achieved remarkable performances, yet the underlying biomechanics resulting in these jump distances are unknown. We measured three-dimensional motion and used multi-segment modelling to quantify and compare the centre of mass (COM) and joint kinematics of three long jumpers with BKA and seven non-amputee long jumpers during the take-off step of the long jump. Despite having the same jump distances, athletes with BKA, who used their affected leg for the take-off step, had lower sagittal plane hip and knee joint range of motion and positioned their affected leg more laterally relative to the COM compared to non-amputee athletes. Athletes with BKA had a longer compression phase and greater downward movement of their COM, suggesting that their affected leg (lever) was less rigid compared to the biological leg of non-amputees. Thus, athletes with BKA used a different kinematic mechanism to redirect horizontal to vertical velocity compared to non-amputee athletes. The specific movement patterns of athletes with BKA during the take-off step were constrained by the mechanical properties of the prosthesis. These results provide a basis for coaches and athletes to develop training protocols that improve performance and inform the design of future prostheses.",
keywords = "Adaptation, Joint angle, Locomotion, Paralympics, Performance analysis, Prosthetics",
author = "Johannes Funken and Steffen Willwacher and Kai Heinrich and Ralf M{\"u}ller and Hiroaki Hobara and Grabowski, {Alena M} and Wolfgang Potthast",
year = "2019",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1098/rsos.190107",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
journal = "Royal Society open Science",
issn = "2054-5703",
publisher = "The Royal Society",
number = "4",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long jumpers with and without a transtibial amputation have different three-dimensional centre of mass and joint take-off step kinematics

AU - Funken, Johannes

AU - Willwacher, Steffen

AU - Heinrich, Kai

AU - Müller, Ralf

AU - Hobara, Hiroaki

AU - Grabowski, Alena M

AU - Potthast, Wolfgang

PY - 2019/4/1

Y1 - 2019/4/1

N2 - Long jumpers with below the knee amputation (BKA) have achieved remarkable performances, yet the underlying biomechanics resulting in these jump distances are unknown. We measured three-dimensional motion and used multi-segment modelling to quantify and compare the centre of mass (COM) and joint kinematics of three long jumpers with BKA and seven non-amputee long jumpers during the take-off step of the long jump. Despite having the same jump distances, athletes with BKA, who used their affected leg for the take-off step, had lower sagittal plane hip and knee joint range of motion and positioned their affected leg more laterally relative to the COM compared to non-amputee athletes. Athletes with BKA had a longer compression phase and greater downward movement of their COM, suggesting that their affected leg (lever) was less rigid compared to the biological leg of non-amputees. Thus, athletes with BKA used a different kinematic mechanism to redirect horizontal to vertical velocity compared to non-amputee athletes. The specific movement patterns of athletes with BKA during the take-off step were constrained by the mechanical properties of the prosthesis. These results provide a basis for coaches and athletes to develop training protocols that improve performance and inform the design of future prostheses.

AB - Long jumpers with below the knee amputation (BKA) have achieved remarkable performances, yet the underlying biomechanics resulting in these jump distances are unknown. We measured three-dimensional motion and used multi-segment modelling to quantify and compare the centre of mass (COM) and joint kinematics of three long jumpers with BKA and seven non-amputee long jumpers during the take-off step of the long jump. Despite having the same jump distances, athletes with BKA, who used their affected leg for the take-off step, had lower sagittal plane hip and knee joint range of motion and positioned their affected leg more laterally relative to the COM compared to non-amputee athletes. Athletes with BKA had a longer compression phase and greater downward movement of their COM, suggesting that their affected leg (lever) was less rigid compared to the biological leg of non-amputees. Thus, athletes with BKA used a different kinematic mechanism to redirect horizontal to vertical velocity compared to non-amputee athletes. The specific movement patterns of athletes with BKA during the take-off step were constrained by the mechanical properties of the prosthesis. These results provide a basis for coaches and athletes to develop training protocols that improve performance and inform the design of future prostheses.

KW - Adaptation

KW - Joint angle

KW - Locomotion

KW - Paralympics

KW - Performance analysis

KW - Prosthetics

UR - https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/08dba0e9-3f6f-3c8d-a458-d08ce488a102/

U2 - 10.1098/rsos.190107

DO - 10.1098/rsos.190107

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 31183149

VL - 6

JO - Royal Society open Science

JF - Royal Society open Science

SN - 2054-5703

IS - 4

M1 - 190107

ER -

ID: 4142351