Nonautomated pre-performance routine in tennis: An intervention study

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Nonautomated pre-performance routine in tennis: An intervention study. / Lautenbach, Franzi; Laborde, Sylvain Jean Pascal; Mesagno, Christopher; Lobinger, Babett; Achtzehn, Silvia; Arimond, Fabian.

in: Journal of Applied Sport Psychology, Jahrgang epub, 11.11.2014.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeTransferBegutachtung

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@article{879563d4326e4577951f08a358d254df,
title = "Nonautomated pre-performance routine in tennis: An intervention study",
abstract = "This study aimed to investigate the effects of a non-automated pre-performance routine (PPR) on tennis serving performance in a high-pressure situation. Twenty-nine tennis players performed 35 second serves in a low- and high-pressure condition in a pre- and post-test design. The intervention group learned a non-automated PPR for four weeks, while the control group received no intervention. Increases in subjective (i.e., visual analogue scale), but not objective (i.e., cortisol), levels of stress were detected in the high-pressure conditions from pre- to post-test in both groups. Furthermore, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in performance in the high-pressure condition in the pre-test (p = .005), but not post-test performance (p = .161). Our findings indicate that athletes who experience a drop in performance in high-pressure situations may benefit from four weeks of non-automated PPR training to alleviate decreases in performance under pressure. ",
author = "Franzi Lautenbach and Laborde, {Sylvain Jean Pascal} and Christopher Mesagno and Babett Lobinger and Silvia Achtzehn and Fabian Arimond",
year = "2014",
month = nov,
day = "11",
doi = "10.1080/10413200.2014.957364",
language = "English",
volume = "epub",
journal = "Journal of Applied Sport Psychology",
issn = "1041-3200",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Nonautomated pre-performance routine in tennis: An intervention study

AU - Lautenbach, Franzi

AU - Laborde, Sylvain Jean Pascal

AU - Mesagno, Christopher

AU - Lobinger, Babett

AU - Achtzehn, Silvia

AU - Arimond, Fabian

PY - 2014/11/11

Y1 - 2014/11/11

N2 - This study aimed to investigate the effects of a non-automated pre-performance routine (PPR) on tennis serving performance in a high-pressure situation. Twenty-nine tennis players performed 35 second serves in a low- and high-pressure condition in a pre- and post-test design. The intervention group learned a non-automated PPR for four weeks, while the control group received no intervention. Increases in subjective (i.e., visual analogue scale), but not objective (i.e., cortisol), levels of stress were detected in the high-pressure conditions from pre- to post-test in both groups. Furthermore, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in performance in the high-pressure condition in the pre-test (p = .005), but not post-test performance (p = .161). Our findings indicate that athletes who experience a drop in performance in high-pressure situations may benefit from four weeks of non-automated PPR training to alleviate decreases in performance under pressure.

AB - This study aimed to investigate the effects of a non-automated pre-performance routine (PPR) on tennis serving performance in a high-pressure situation. Twenty-nine tennis players performed 35 second serves in a low- and high-pressure condition in a pre- and post-test design. The intervention group learned a non-automated PPR for four weeks, while the control group received no intervention. Increases in subjective (i.e., visual analogue scale), but not objective (i.e., cortisol), levels of stress were detected in the high-pressure conditions from pre- to post-test in both groups. Furthermore, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in performance in the high-pressure condition in the pre-test (p = .005), but not post-test performance (p = .161). Our findings indicate that athletes who experience a drop in performance in high-pressure situations may benefit from four weeks of non-automated PPR training to alleviate decreases in performance under pressure.

U2 - 10.1080/10413200.2014.957364

DO - 10.1080/10413200.2014.957364

M3 - Journal articles

VL - epub

JO - Journal of Applied Sport Psychology

JF - Journal of Applied Sport Psychology

SN - 1041-3200

ER -

ID: 375582