Spatiotemporal parameters in sprinters with unilateral and bilateral transfemoral amputations and functional impairments

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Spatiotemporal parameters in sprinters with unilateral and bilateral transfemoral amputations and functional impairments. / Hobara, Hiroaki; Hashizume, Satoru; Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki; Namiki, Yuta; Müller, Ralf; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang.

in: European journal of applied physiology, 08.10.2018.

Publikationen: Beitrag in FachzeitschriftZeitschriftenaufsätzeForschungBegutachtung

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@article{0a67cf798a4d4b098b7d6f0b5e0aedf8,
title = "Spatiotemporal parameters in sprinters with unilateral and bilateral transfemoral amputations and functional impairments",
abstract = "PURPOSE: Although sprinters with unilateral (UTF) and bilateral transfemoral (BTF) amputations and functional impairments (FIs) without amputation were allocated into different classifications because of the recent revision of the International Paralympic Committee Athletics Rules and Regulations, it is unclear whether running mechanics differ among the three groups. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the spatiotemporal parameters of the three groups during 100-m sprint in official competitions.METHODS: Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 11 elite-level sprinters with UTF amputation, 4 sprinters with BTF amputation, and 5 sprinters with FI without amputation. The best personal times for nearly all individuals were included. For each sprinter's race, the average speed, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time.RESULTS: Although there were no significant differences in the average speed among the UTF, BTF, and FI groups (7.95 ± 0.22, 7.90 ± 0.42, and 7.93 ± 0.14 m/s, respectively, p = 0.87), those with BTF amputation showed significantly lower step frequency (UTF: 4.20 ± 0.20 Hz, BTF: 3.71 ± 0.32 Hz, FI: 4.20 ± 0.10 Hz, p < 0.05) and longer step length (UTF: 1.90 ± 0.08 m, BTF: 2.14 ± 0.02 m, FI: 1.89 ± 0.06 m, p < 0.05) than the other two groups.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the step characteristics during sprinting are not the same among sprinters with UTF amputation, BTF amputations, or FI without amputations.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Hiroaki Hobara and Satoru Hashizume and Yoshiyuki Kobayashi and Yuta Namiki and Ralf M{\"u}ller and Johannes Funken and Wolfgang Potthast",
note = "Online: 08.10.2018",
year = "2018",
month = oct,
day = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s00421-018-4001-1",
language = "English",
journal = "European journal of applied physiology",
issn = "1439-6319",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Spatiotemporal parameters in sprinters with unilateral and bilateral transfemoral amputations and functional impairments

AU - Hobara, Hiroaki

AU - Hashizume, Satoru

AU - Kobayashi, Yoshiyuki

AU - Namiki, Yuta

AU - Müller, Ralf

AU - Funken, Johannes

AU - Potthast, Wolfgang

N1 - Online: 08.10.2018

PY - 2018/10/8

Y1 - 2018/10/8

N2 - PURPOSE: Although sprinters with unilateral (UTF) and bilateral transfemoral (BTF) amputations and functional impairments (FIs) without amputation were allocated into different classifications because of the recent revision of the International Paralympic Committee Athletics Rules and Regulations, it is unclear whether running mechanics differ among the three groups. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the spatiotemporal parameters of the three groups during 100-m sprint in official competitions.METHODS: Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 11 elite-level sprinters with UTF amputation, 4 sprinters with BTF amputation, and 5 sprinters with FI without amputation. The best personal times for nearly all individuals were included. For each sprinter's race, the average speed, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time.RESULTS: Although there were no significant differences in the average speed among the UTF, BTF, and FI groups (7.95 ± 0.22, 7.90 ± 0.42, and 7.93 ± 0.14 m/s, respectively, p = 0.87), those with BTF amputation showed significantly lower step frequency (UTF: 4.20 ± 0.20 Hz, BTF: 3.71 ± 0.32 Hz, FI: 4.20 ± 0.10 Hz, p < 0.05) and longer step length (UTF: 1.90 ± 0.08 m, BTF: 2.14 ± 0.02 m, FI: 1.89 ± 0.06 m, p < 0.05) than the other two groups.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the step characteristics during sprinting are not the same among sprinters with UTF amputation, BTF amputations, or FI without amputations.

AB - PURPOSE: Although sprinters with unilateral (UTF) and bilateral transfemoral (BTF) amputations and functional impairments (FIs) without amputation were allocated into different classifications because of the recent revision of the International Paralympic Committee Athletics Rules and Regulations, it is unclear whether running mechanics differ among the three groups. The aim of this study was to investigate the differences in the spatiotemporal parameters of the three groups during 100-m sprint in official competitions.METHODS: Using publicly available Internet broadcasts, we analyzed 11 elite-level sprinters with UTF amputation, 4 sprinters with BTF amputation, and 5 sprinters with FI without amputation. The best personal times for nearly all individuals were included. For each sprinter's race, the average speed, step frequency, and step length were calculated using the number of steps in conjunction with the official race time.RESULTS: Although there were no significant differences in the average speed among the UTF, BTF, and FI groups (7.95 ± 0.22, 7.90 ± 0.42, and 7.93 ± 0.14 m/s, respectively, p = 0.87), those with BTF amputation showed significantly lower step frequency (UTF: 4.20 ± 0.20 Hz, BTF: 3.71 ± 0.32 Hz, FI: 4.20 ± 0.10 Hz, p < 0.05) and longer step length (UTF: 1.90 ± 0.08 m, BTF: 2.14 ± 0.02 m, FI: 1.89 ± 0.06 m, p < 0.05) than the other two groups.CONCLUSION: These results suggest that the step characteristics during sprinting are not the same among sprinters with UTF amputation, BTF amputations, or FI without amputations.

KW - Journal Article

U2 - 10.1007/s00421-018-4001-1

DO - 10.1007/s00421-018-4001-1

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 30298456

JO - European journal of applied physiology

JF - European journal of applied physiology

SN - 1439-6319

ER -

ID: 3502796