Effects of stair-climbing on balance, gait, strength, resting heart rate, and submaximal endurance in healthy seniors

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Effects of stair-climbing on balance, gait, strength, resting heart rate, and submaximal endurance in healthy seniors. / Donath, L; Faude, O; Roth, R; Zahner, L.

In: Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports, Vol. 24, No. 2, 04.2014, p. e93-e101.

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@article{ae41fcac5cec48b5a601b01edc4c8372,
title = "Effects of stair-climbing on balance, gait, strength, resting heart rate, and submaximal endurance in healthy seniors",
abstract = "Stair-climbing serves as a feasible opportunity to remain physically active within everyday-life. Data on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performance after regular stair-climbing in seniors are scarce. Forty-eight seniors were stratified to a one- (taking every step, INT1) or two-step strategy (every second step, INT2) or a control group (CON). Thirty-nine seniors [females: n = 22, males: n = 17; age: 70.5 (SD 5.1) years; BMI: 25.8 (3.1) kg/m(2)] completed the 8-week intervention (three weekly sessions). Before and after the intervention, balance, gait, strength, and submaximal endurance (at different intensities) were assessed. Maximal strength and explosive power did not improve significantly (0.10 < P < 0.78). Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in INT2 (-8/min) compared with INT1 (0/min, P = 0.02) and CON (0/min, P = 0.03). Compared with CON, perceived exertion for all intensities (0.007 < P < 0.03) and submaximal exercise heart rate during moderate uphill walking significantly decreased (-11/min; P < 0.05) in INT2. Step counts for forward beam balancing (4.5 cm width) increased in INT2 (P = 0.007) compared with CON. With more pronounced effects in INT2, stair-climbing significantly improved resting and exercise heart rates, perceived exertion, and dynamic balance performance in healthy seniors and may contribute to better overall fitness, reduced fall risk, and less perceived strain during daily life activities.",
keywords = "Aged, Female, Gait, Heart Rate, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Movement, Muscle Strength, Muscle, Skeletal, Physical Conditioning, Human, Physical Endurance, Physical Exertion, Postural Balance, Surveys and Questionnaires, Walking, Journal Article, Randomized Controlled Trial",
author = "L Donath and O Faude and R Roth and L Zahner",
note = "{\textcopyright} 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.",
year = "2014",
month = apr,
doi = "10.1111/sms.12113",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "e93--e101",
journal = "Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports",
issn = "1600-0838",
publisher = "Blackwell Munksgaard",
number = "2",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of stair-climbing on balance, gait, strength, resting heart rate, and submaximal endurance in healthy seniors

AU - Donath, L

AU - Faude, O

AU - Roth, R

AU - Zahner, L

N1 - © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

PY - 2014/4

Y1 - 2014/4

N2 - Stair-climbing serves as a feasible opportunity to remain physically active within everyday-life. Data on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performance after regular stair-climbing in seniors are scarce. Forty-eight seniors were stratified to a one- (taking every step, INT1) or two-step strategy (every second step, INT2) or a control group (CON). Thirty-nine seniors [females: n = 22, males: n = 17; age: 70.5 (SD 5.1) years; BMI: 25.8 (3.1) kg/m(2)] completed the 8-week intervention (three weekly sessions). Before and after the intervention, balance, gait, strength, and submaximal endurance (at different intensities) were assessed. Maximal strength and explosive power did not improve significantly (0.10 < P < 0.78). Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in INT2 (-8/min) compared with INT1 (0/min, P = 0.02) and CON (0/min, P = 0.03). Compared with CON, perceived exertion for all intensities (0.007 < P < 0.03) and submaximal exercise heart rate during moderate uphill walking significantly decreased (-11/min; P < 0.05) in INT2. Step counts for forward beam balancing (4.5 cm width) increased in INT2 (P = 0.007) compared with CON. With more pronounced effects in INT2, stair-climbing significantly improved resting and exercise heart rates, perceived exertion, and dynamic balance performance in healthy seniors and may contribute to better overall fitness, reduced fall risk, and less perceived strain during daily life activities.

AB - Stair-climbing serves as a feasible opportunity to remain physically active within everyday-life. Data on neuromuscular and cardiorespiratory performance after regular stair-climbing in seniors are scarce. Forty-eight seniors were stratified to a one- (taking every step, INT1) or two-step strategy (every second step, INT2) or a control group (CON). Thirty-nine seniors [females: n = 22, males: n = 17; age: 70.5 (SD 5.1) years; BMI: 25.8 (3.1) kg/m(2)] completed the 8-week intervention (three weekly sessions). Before and after the intervention, balance, gait, strength, and submaximal endurance (at different intensities) were assessed. Maximal strength and explosive power did not improve significantly (0.10 < P < 0.78). Resting heart rate was significantly reduced in INT2 (-8/min) compared with INT1 (0/min, P = 0.02) and CON (0/min, P = 0.03). Compared with CON, perceived exertion for all intensities (0.007 < P < 0.03) and submaximal exercise heart rate during moderate uphill walking significantly decreased (-11/min; P < 0.05) in INT2. Step counts for forward beam balancing (4.5 cm width) increased in INT2 (P = 0.007) compared with CON. With more pronounced effects in INT2, stair-climbing significantly improved resting and exercise heart rates, perceived exertion, and dynamic balance performance in healthy seniors and may contribute to better overall fitness, reduced fall risk, and less perceived strain during daily life activities.

KW - Aged

KW - Female

KW - Gait

KW - Heart Rate

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Middle Aged

KW - Movement

KW - Muscle Strength

KW - Muscle, Skeletal

KW - Physical Conditioning, Human

KW - Physical Endurance

KW - Physical Exertion

KW - Postural Balance

KW - Surveys and Questionnaires

KW - Walking

KW - Journal Article

KW - Randomized Controlled Trial

U2 - 10.1111/sms.12113

DO - 10.1111/sms.12113

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 24033611

VL - 24

SP - e93-e101

JO - Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports

JF - Scandinavian journal of medicine & science in sports

SN - 1600-0838

SN - 0905-7188

IS - 2

ER -

ID: 3298775