Effects of two different resistance-training programs on mean tennis-serve velocity in adolescents

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Effects of two different resistance-training programs on mean tennis-serve velocity in adolescents. / Behringer, Michael; Neuerburg, Sebastian; Matthews, Maria; Mester, Joachim.

In: Pediatric exercise science, Vol. 25, No. 3, 01.08.2013, p. 370-384.

Publication: Research - peer-reviewJournal articles

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@article{db6cee41186c4a98b1e8ac51cfb3bac3,
title = "Effects of two different resistance-training programs on mean tennis-serve velocity in adolescents",
keywords = "Adolescent, Analysis of Variance, Anthropometry, Athletic Performance, Humans, Intervention Studies, Male, Muscle Strength, Plyometric Exercise, Reference Values, Resistance Training, Task Performance and Analysis, Tennis, Time Factors",
author = "Michael Behringer and Sebastian Neuerburg and Maria Matthews and Joachim Mester",
year = "2013",
month = "8",
volume = "25",
pages = "370--384",
journal = "Pediatric exercise science",
issn = "1543-2920",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of two different resistance-training programs on mean tennis-serve velocity in adolescents

AU - Behringer,Michael

AU - Neuerburg,Sebastian

AU - Matthews,Maria

AU - Mester,Joachim

PY - 2013/8/1

Y1 - 2013/8/1

N2 - <p>The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the transferability of 2 different resistance training protocols on service velocity and its precision consistency in junior tennis players. Thirty-six male athletes (15.03 ± 1.64 years) were randomly assigned to a machine-based resistance-training group (RG, n = 12), a plyometric training group (PG, n = 12), and a control group (CG, n = 12). For a period of 8 weeks, both intervention groups resistance trained 2 days per week in addition to their regular tennis training, whereas the CG had no extra training. Mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves increased significantly more in PG (3.78%; p &lt; .05) when compared with CG, whereas no such changes could be found in the RG (1.18%; p &gt; .05). Service precision did not change from pre- to posttest in all three groups (p &gt; .05). Only the plyometric training program tested, improved mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves in junior tennis players but did not affect service precision.</p>

AB - <p>The purpose of the current study was to evaluate the transferability of 2 different resistance training protocols on service velocity and its precision consistency in junior tennis players. Thirty-six male athletes (15.03 ± 1.64 years) were randomly assigned to a machine-based resistance-training group (RG, n = 12), a plyometric training group (PG, n = 12), and a control group (CG, n = 12). For a period of 8 weeks, both intervention groups resistance trained 2 days per week in addition to their regular tennis training, whereas the CG had no extra training. Mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves increased significantly more in PG (3.78%; p &lt; .05) when compared with CG, whereas no such changes could be found in the RG (1.18%; p &gt; .05). Service precision did not change from pre- to posttest in all three groups (p &gt; .05). Only the plyometric training program tested, improved mean service velocity over 20 maximum-velocity serves in junior tennis players but did not affect service precision.</p>

KW - Adolescent

KW - Analysis of Variance

KW - Anthropometry

KW - Athletic Performance

KW - Humans

KW - Intervention Studies

KW - Male

KW - Muscle Strength

KW - Plyometric Exercise

KW - Reference Values

KW - Resistance Training

KW - Task Performance and Analysis

KW - Tennis

KW - Time Factors

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 25

SP - 370

EP - 384

JO - Pediatric exercise science

T2 - Pediatric exercise science

JF - Pediatric exercise science

SN - 1543-2920

SN - 0899-8493

IS - 3

ER -

ID: 197708