Gaze Behavior While Operating a Complex Instrument Control Task

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Gaze Behavior While Operating a Complex Instrument Control Task. / Kalicinski, Michael; Steinberg, Fabian; Dalecki, Marc; Bock, Otmar.

In: Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance, Vol. 87, No. 7, 07.2016, p. 646-51.

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@article{0acc0e8fdd64404cadf84e6618dd9978,
title = "Gaze Behavior While Operating a Complex Instrument Control Task",
abstract = "INTRODUCTION: The recent developments of technology in almost all areas of industrial processing, workplace, smart homes, mobility, media, and communication change humans' everyday life environment and behavioral responses in numerous ways. Our main objective in this study was to determine whether subjects' operator performance in a complex sensorimotor task is associated with their gaze behavior.METHODS: In two experiments subjects operated a complex control task. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions, and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from operating a virtual power plant. In Experiment 1 we compared gaze behavior during the tasks with respect to operator performance in two different age groups (young vs. old), and in Experiment 2 in two different gravity conditions (normal vs. microgravity).RESULTS: We found gaze pattern changed in older subjects as well as in microgravity. Older adults and subjects in microgravity looked longer at areas that are less relevant for task success. Most importantly, these changes in gaze pattern accounted for the effects of age and microgravity and on total earnings in the instrument-control task.DISCUSSION: In conclusion, age- and gravity-related changes of gaze behavior show a similar pattern. Gaze behavior seems to play an important role in complex control tasks and might predict alterations of operational performance. Kalicinski M, Steinberg F, Dalecki M, Bock O. Gaze behavior while operating a complex instrument control task. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(7):646-651.",
keywords = "Age Factors, Aged, Eye Movements, Female, Humans, Task Performance and Analysis, Weightlessness, Young Adult, Journal Article, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't",
author = "Michael Kalicinski and Fabian Steinberg and Marc Dalecki and Otmar Bock",
year = "2016",
month = jul,
doi = "10.3357/AMHP.4542.2016",
language = "English",
volume = "87",
pages = "646--51",
journal = "Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance",
issn = "2375-6314",
publisher = "Aerospace Medical Association",
number = "7",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Gaze Behavior While Operating a Complex Instrument Control Task

AU - Kalicinski, Michael

AU - Steinberg, Fabian

AU - Dalecki, Marc

AU - Bock, Otmar

PY - 2016/7

Y1 - 2016/7

N2 - INTRODUCTION: The recent developments of technology in almost all areas of industrial processing, workplace, smart homes, mobility, media, and communication change humans' everyday life environment and behavioral responses in numerous ways. Our main objective in this study was to determine whether subjects' operator performance in a complex sensorimotor task is associated with their gaze behavior.METHODS: In two experiments subjects operated a complex control task. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions, and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from operating a virtual power plant. In Experiment 1 we compared gaze behavior during the tasks with respect to operator performance in two different age groups (young vs. old), and in Experiment 2 in two different gravity conditions (normal vs. microgravity).RESULTS: We found gaze pattern changed in older subjects as well as in microgravity. Older adults and subjects in microgravity looked longer at areas that are less relevant for task success. Most importantly, these changes in gaze pattern accounted for the effects of age and microgravity and on total earnings in the instrument-control task.DISCUSSION: In conclusion, age- and gravity-related changes of gaze behavior show a similar pattern. Gaze behavior seems to play an important role in complex control tasks and might predict alterations of operational performance. Kalicinski M, Steinberg F, Dalecki M, Bock O. Gaze behavior while operating a complex instrument control task. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(7):646-651.

AB - INTRODUCTION: The recent developments of technology in almost all areas of industrial processing, workplace, smart homes, mobility, media, and communication change humans' everyday life environment and behavioral responses in numerous ways. Our main objective in this study was to determine whether subjects' operator performance in a complex sensorimotor task is associated with their gaze behavior.METHODS: In two experiments subjects operated a complex control task. To this end they watched multiple displays, made strategic decisions, and used multiple actuators to maximize their virtual earnings from operating a virtual power plant. In Experiment 1 we compared gaze behavior during the tasks with respect to operator performance in two different age groups (young vs. old), and in Experiment 2 in two different gravity conditions (normal vs. microgravity).RESULTS: We found gaze pattern changed in older subjects as well as in microgravity. Older adults and subjects in microgravity looked longer at areas that are less relevant for task success. Most importantly, these changes in gaze pattern accounted for the effects of age and microgravity and on total earnings in the instrument-control task.DISCUSSION: In conclusion, age- and gravity-related changes of gaze behavior show a similar pattern. Gaze behavior seems to play an important role in complex control tasks and might predict alterations of operational performance. Kalicinski M, Steinberg F, Dalecki M, Bock O. Gaze behavior while operating a complex instrument control task. Aerosp Med Hum Perform. 2016; 87(7):646-651.

KW - Age Factors

KW - Aged

KW - Eye Movements

KW - Female

KW - Humans

KW - Task Performance and Analysis

KW - Weightlessness

KW - Young Adult

KW - Journal Article

KW - Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

U2 - 10.3357/AMHP.4542.2016

DO - 10.3357/AMHP.4542.2016

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 27503045

VL - 87

SP - 646

EP - 651

JO - Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance

JF - Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance

SN - 2375-6314

IS - 7

ER -

ID: 3005087