Hemispheric differences of motor execution: a near-infrared spectroscopy study

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Hemispheric differences of motor execution : a near-infrared spectroscopy study. / Helmich, Ingo; Rein, Robert; Niermann, Nico; Lausberg, Hedda.

In: Advances in experimental medicine and biology, Vol. 789, 01.01.2013, p. 59-64.

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@article{f44562bab3504694a5ace48cfd13371a,
title = "Hemispheric differences of motor execution: a near-infrared spectroscopy study",
abstract = "Distal movements of the limbs are predominantly controlled by the contralateral hemisphere. However, functional neuroimaging studies do not unequivocally demonstrate a lateralization of the cerebral activation during hand movements. While some studies show a predominant activation of the contralateral hemisphere, other studies provide evidence for a symmetrically distributed bihemispheric activation. However, the divergent results may also be due to methodological shortcomings. Therefore, the present study using functional near-infrared spectroscopy examines cerebral activation in both hemispheres during motor actions of the right and left hands. Twenty participants performed a flexion/extension task with the right- or left-hand thumb. Cerebral oxygenation changes were recorded from 48 channels over the primary motor, pre-motor, supplementary motor, primary somatosensory cortex, subcentral area, and the supramarginal gyrus of each hemisphere. A consistent increase of cerebral oxygenation was found for oxygenated and for total hemoglobin in the hemisphere contralateral to the moving hand, regardless of the laterality. These findings are in line with previous data from localization [1-3] and brain imaging studies [4-6]. The present data support the proposition that there is no hemispheric specialization for simple distal motor tasks. Both hemispheres are equally activated during movement of the contralateral upper limb.",
keywords = "Adult, Brain Mapping, Dominance, Cerebral, Female, Functional Laterality, Functional Neuroimaging, Humans, Male, Motor Cortex, Movement, Oxygen, Psychomotor Performance, Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared, Thumb, Young Adult",
author = "Ingo Helmich and Robert Rein and Nico Niermann and Hedda Lausberg",
year = "2013",
month = jan,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_9",
language = "English",
volume = "789",
pages = "59--64",
journal = "Advances in experimental medicine and biology",
issn = "0065-2598",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Hemispheric differences of motor execution

T2 - a near-infrared spectroscopy study

AU - Helmich, Ingo

AU - Rein, Robert

AU - Niermann, Nico

AU - Lausberg, Hedda

PY - 2013/1/1

Y1 - 2013/1/1

N2 - Distal movements of the limbs are predominantly controlled by the contralateral hemisphere. However, functional neuroimaging studies do not unequivocally demonstrate a lateralization of the cerebral activation during hand movements. While some studies show a predominant activation of the contralateral hemisphere, other studies provide evidence for a symmetrically distributed bihemispheric activation. However, the divergent results may also be due to methodological shortcomings. Therefore, the present study using functional near-infrared spectroscopy examines cerebral activation in both hemispheres during motor actions of the right and left hands. Twenty participants performed a flexion/extension task with the right- or left-hand thumb. Cerebral oxygenation changes were recorded from 48 channels over the primary motor, pre-motor, supplementary motor, primary somatosensory cortex, subcentral area, and the supramarginal gyrus of each hemisphere. A consistent increase of cerebral oxygenation was found for oxygenated and for total hemoglobin in the hemisphere contralateral to the moving hand, regardless of the laterality. These findings are in line with previous data from localization [1-3] and brain imaging studies [4-6]. The present data support the proposition that there is no hemispheric specialization for simple distal motor tasks. Both hemispheres are equally activated during movement of the contralateral upper limb.

AB - Distal movements of the limbs are predominantly controlled by the contralateral hemisphere. However, functional neuroimaging studies do not unequivocally demonstrate a lateralization of the cerebral activation during hand movements. While some studies show a predominant activation of the contralateral hemisphere, other studies provide evidence for a symmetrically distributed bihemispheric activation. However, the divergent results may also be due to methodological shortcomings. Therefore, the present study using functional near-infrared spectroscopy examines cerebral activation in both hemispheres during motor actions of the right and left hands. Twenty participants performed a flexion/extension task with the right- or left-hand thumb. Cerebral oxygenation changes were recorded from 48 channels over the primary motor, pre-motor, supplementary motor, primary somatosensory cortex, subcentral area, and the supramarginal gyrus of each hemisphere. A consistent increase of cerebral oxygenation was found for oxygenated and for total hemoglobin in the hemisphere contralateral to the moving hand, regardless of the laterality. These findings are in line with previous data from localization [1-3] and brain imaging studies [4-6]. The present data support the proposition that there is no hemispheric specialization for simple distal motor tasks. Both hemispheres are equally activated during movement of the contralateral upper limb.

KW - Adult

KW - Brain Mapping

KW - Dominance, Cerebral

KW - Female

KW - Functional Laterality

KW - Functional Neuroimaging

KW - Humans

KW - Male

KW - Motor Cortex

KW - Movement

KW - Oxygen

KW - Psychomotor Performance

KW - Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared

KW - Thumb

KW - Young Adult

U2 - 10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_9

DO - 10.1007/978-1-4614-7411-1_9

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 23852477

VL - 789

SP - 59

EP - 64

JO - Advances in experimental medicine and biology

JF - Advances in experimental medicine and biology

SN - 0065-2598

ER -

ID: 155534