Influence of neutral and stability athletic footwear on lower extremity coordination variability during a prolonged treadmill run in male rearfoot runners

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Influence of neutral and stability athletic footwear on lower extremity coordination variability during a prolonged treadmill run in male rearfoot runners. / Weir, Gillian; Wyatt, Hannah; Van Emmerik, Richard; Trudeau, Matthieu B; Willwacher, Steffen; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Hamill, Joseph.

In: European Journal of Sport Science, 10.10.2019, p. 1-7.

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@article{172ca7d111324635a479f4586e0f9800,
title = "Influence of neutral and stability athletic footwear on lower extremity coordination variability during a prolonged treadmill run in male rearfoot runners",
abstract = "The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in coordination variability (CV) over the course of a prolonged treadmill run and the influence of stability and neutral footwear on CV. Fourteen male habitually rearfoot runners completed two 42 min prolonged running sessions while three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were recorded. During the first 21 min, participants ran in a neutral shoe (baseline run), then changed into either another neutral shoe of the same construction but another colour or a stability shoe and ran a further 21 min (intervention run). A modified vector coding technique was used to compute thigh-leg, leg-rearfoot and rearfoot-forefoot segment CV. Following the baseline run, thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension, rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot plantar flexion/dorsiflexion and rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot adduction/abduction CV increased (p < .05). During the intervention run, CV was higher in the neutral shoe compared with the stability shoe for thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension and leg flexion/extension-rearfoot inversion/eversion couplings (p < .05). Lower extremity CV increased or was maintained during a prolonged treadmill run in healthy male rearfoot runners, likely to distribute stresses among the tissues as muscles begin to fatigue. CV increased to a greater extent in neutral compared with stability footwear which may be a result of: (1) the stability shoe acting as a perturbation to the runner and their response is to regulate CV, or; (2) stability footwear provides greater support and consequently, runners do not need to explore additional degrees of freedom to reduce stresses applied to the tissues throughout a prolonged run.",
keywords = "Running, kinematics, shoes, vector coding",
author = "Gillian Weir and Hannah Wyatt and {Van Emmerik}, Richard and Trudeau, {Matthieu B} and Steffen Willwacher and Gert-Peter Br{\"u}ggemann and Joseph Hamill",
note = "Online: 10.10.2019",
year = "2019",
month = oct,
day = "10",
doi = "10.1080/17461391.2019.1670867",
language = "English",
pages = "1--7",
journal = "European Journal of Sport Science",
issn = "1746-1391",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis Ltd.",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of neutral and stability athletic footwear on lower extremity coordination variability during a prolonged treadmill run in male rearfoot runners

AU - Weir, Gillian

AU - Wyatt, Hannah

AU - Van Emmerik, Richard

AU - Trudeau, Matthieu B

AU - Willwacher, Steffen

AU - Brüggemann, Gert-Peter

AU - Hamill, Joseph

N1 - Online: 10.10.2019

PY - 2019/10/10

Y1 - 2019/10/10

N2 - The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in coordination variability (CV) over the course of a prolonged treadmill run and the influence of stability and neutral footwear on CV. Fourteen male habitually rearfoot runners completed two 42 min prolonged running sessions while three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were recorded. During the first 21 min, participants ran in a neutral shoe (baseline run), then changed into either another neutral shoe of the same construction but another colour or a stability shoe and ran a further 21 min (intervention run). A modified vector coding technique was used to compute thigh-leg, leg-rearfoot and rearfoot-forefoot segment CV. Following the baseline run, thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension, rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot plantar flexion/dorsiflexion and rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot adduction/abduction CV increased (p < .05). During the intervention run, CV was higher in the neutral shoe compared with the stability shoe for thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension and leg flexion/extension-rearfoot inversion/eversion couplings (p < .05). Lower extremity CV increased or was maintained during a prolonged treadmill run in healthy male rearfoot runners, likely to distribute stresses among the tissues as muscles begin to fatigue. CV increased to a greater extent in neutral compared with stability footwear which may be a result of: (1) the stability shoe acting as a perturbation to the runner and their response is to regulate CV, or; (2) stability footwear provides greater support and consequently, runners do not need to explore additional degrees of freedom to reduce stresses applied to the tissues throughout a prolonged run.

AB - The purpose of this study was to investigate changes in coordination variability (CV) over the course of a prolonged treadmill run and the influence of stability and neutral footwear on CV. Fourteen male habitually rearfoot runners completed two 42 min prolonged running sessions while three-dimensional kinematics and kinetics were recorded. During the first 21 min, participants ran in a neutral shoe (baseline run), then changed into either another neutral shoe of the same construction but another colour or a stability shoe and ran a further 21 min (intervention run). A modified vector coding technique was used to compute thigh-leg, leg-rearfoot and rearfoot-forefoot segment CV. Following the baseline run, thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension, rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot plantar flexion/dorsiflexion and rearfoot inversion/eversion-forefoot adduction/abduction CV increased (p < .05). During the intervention run, CV was higher in the neutral shoe compared with the stability shoe for thigh flexion/extension-leg flexion/extension and leg flexion/extension-rearfoot inversion/eversion couplings (p < .05). Lower extremity CV increased or was maintained during a prolonged treadmill run in healthy male rearfoot runners, likely to distribute stresses among the tissues as muscles begin to fatigue. CV increased to a greater extent in neutral compared with stability footwear which may be a result of: (1) the stability shoe acting as a perturbation to the runner and their response is to regulate CV, or; (2) stability footwear provides greater support and consequently, runners do not need to explore additional degrees of freedom to reduce stresses applied to the tissues throughout a prolonged run.

KW - Running

KW - kinematics

KW - shoes

KW - vector coding

UR - https://www.mendeley.com/catalogue/db2d5b6f-3799-3569-af9d-2e2c4f2e7783/

U2 - 10.1080/17461391.2019.1670867

DO - 10.1080/17461391.2019.1670867

M3 - Journal articles

C2 - 31543009

SP - 1

EP - 7

JO - European Journal of Sport Science

JF - European Journal of Sport Science

SN - 1746-1391

ER -

ID: 5046924