Kinematics and kinetics of handcycling propulsion at increasing workloads in able-bodied subjects

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@article{916c863cd63444d09698869092c86bd1,
title = "Kinematics and kinetics of handcycling propulsion at increasing workloads in able-bodied subjects",
abstract = "In Paralympic sports, biomechanical optimisation of movements and equipment seems to be promising for improvingperformance. In handcycling, information about the biomechanics of this sport is mainly provided by case studies. The aimof the current study was (1) to examine changes in handcycling propulsion kinematics and kinetics due to increasingworkloads and (2) identify parameters that are associated with peak aerobic performance. Twelve non-disabled malecompetitive triathletes without handcycling experience voluntarily participated in the study. They performed an initialfamiliarisation protocol and incremental step test until exhaustion in a recumbent racing handcycle that was attached to anergometer. During the incremental test, tangential crank kinetics, 3D joint kinematics, blood lactate and ratings ofperceived exertion (local and global) were identified. As a performance criterion, the maximal power output during the steptest (Pmax) was calculated and correlated with biomechanical parameters. For higher workloads, an increase in crank torquewas observed that was even more pronounced in the pull phase than in the push phase. Furthermore, participants showed anincrease in shoulder internal rotation and abduction and a decrease in elbow flexion and retroversion. These changes werenegatively correlated with performance. At high workloads, it seems that power output is more limited by the transitionfrom pull to push phase than at low workloads. It is suggested that successful athletes demonstrate small alterations of theirkinematic profile due to increasing workloads. Future studies should replicate and expand the test spectrum (sprint andcontinuous loads) as well as use methods like surface electromyography (sEMG) with elite handcyclists.",
author = "Quittmann, {Oliver Jan} and Joshua Meskemper and Thomas Abel and Kirsten Albracht and Tina Foitschik and {Rojas Vega}, Sandra and Str{\"u}der, {Heiko Klaus}",
note = "https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007{\%}2Fs12283-018-0269-y",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "7",
doi = "10.1007/s12283-018-0269-y",
language = "English",
journal = "Sports Engineering",
issn = "1369-7072",
publisher = "Springer Science $ Business Media",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Kinematics and kinetics of handcycling propulsion at increasing workloads in able-bodied subjects

AU - Quittmann, Oliver Jan

AU - Meskemper, Joshua

AU - Abel, Thomas

AU - Albracht, Kirsten

AU - Foitschik, Tina

AU - Rojas Vega, Sandra

AU - Strüder, Heiko Klaus

N1 - https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs12283-018-0269-y

PY - 2018/4/7

Y1 - 2018/4/7

N2 - In Paralympic sports, biomechanical optimisation of movements and equipment seems to be promising for improvingperformance. In handcycling, information about the biomechanics of this sport is mainly provided by case studies. The aimof the current study was (1) to examine changes in handcycling propulsion kinematics and kinetics due to increasingworkloads and (2) identify parameters that are associated with peak aerobic performance. Twelve non-disabled malecompetitive triathletes without handcycling experience voluntarily participated in the study. They performed an initialfamiliarisation protocol and incremental step test until exhaustion in a recumbent racing handcycle that was attached to anergometer. During the incremental test, tangential crank kinetics, 3D joint kinematics, blood lactate and ratings ofperceived exertion (local and global) were identified. As a performance criterion, the maximal power output during the steptest (Pmax) was calculated and correlated with biomechanical parameters. For higher workloads, an increase in crank torquewas observed that was even more pronounced in the pull phase than in the push phase. Furthermore, participants showed anincrease in shoulder internal rotation and abduction and a decrease in elbow flexion and retroversion. These changes werenegatively correlated with performance. At high workloads, it seems that power output is more limited by the transitionfrom pull to push phase than at low workloads. It is suggested that successful athletes demonstrate small alterations of theirkinematic profile due to increasing workloads. Future studies should replicate and expand the test spectrum (sprint andcontinuous loads) as well as use methods like surface electromyography (sEMG) with elite handcyclists.

AB - In Paralympic sports, biomechanical optimisation of movements and equipment seems to be promising for improvingperformance. In handcycling, information about the biomechanics of this sport is mainly provided by case studies. The aimof the current study was (1) to examine changes in handcycling propulsion kinematics and kinetics due to increasingworkloads and (2) identify parameters that are associated with peak aerobic performance. Twelve non-disabled malecompetitive triathletes without handcycling experience voluntarily participated in the study. They performed an initialfamiliarisation protocol and incremental step test until exhaustion in a recumbent racing handcycle that was attached to anergometer. During the incremental test, tangential crank kinetics, 3D joint kinematics, blood lactate and ratings ofperceived exertion (local and global) were identified. As a performance criterion, the maximal power output during the steptest (Pmax) was calculated and correlated with biomechanical parameters. For higher workloads, an increase in crank torquewas observed that was even more pronounced in the pull phase than in the push phase. Furthermore, participants showed anincrease in shoulder internal rotation and abduction and a decrease in elbow flexion and retroversion. These changes werenegatively correlated with performance. At high workloads, it seems that power output is more limited by the transitionfrom pull to push phase than at low workloads. It is suggested that successful athletes demonstrate small alterations of theirkinematic profile due to increasing workloads. Future studies should replicate and expand the test spectrum (sprint andcontinuous loads) as well as use methods like surface electromyography (sEMG) with elite handcyclists.

U2 - 10.1007/s12283-018-0269-y

DO - 10.1007/s12283-018-0269-y

M3 - Journal articles

JO - Sports Engineering

JF - Sports Engineering

SN - 1369-7072

ER -

ID: 3274115