Long-term effectiveness of health coaching in rehabilitation and prevention: A systematic review

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Long-term effectiveness of health coaching in rehabilitation and prevention: A systematic review. / Dejonghe, Lea Anna Lisa; Becker, Jennifer; Froböse, Ingo; Schaller, Andrea.

In: Patient Education and Counseling, Vol. 100, No. 9, 2017, p. 1643-1653.

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@article{78085036f2ff4ac584e82364334d214d,
title = "Long-term effectiveness of health coaching in rehabilitation and prevention: A systematic review",
abstract = "ObjectiveThis systematic review aims to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of health coaching interventions in rehabilitation and prevention.MethodsDatabases and a manual search were used to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in English through to June 2015. Studies were included if: (1) the target population were people of employment age, (2) the intervention addressed either people suffering from a diagnosed disease or healthy people, (3) the intervention included health coaching to influence health-related outcomes and/or processes and (4) the study had a follow-up of at least 24 weeks after the end of the intervention period.ResultsOut of 90 RCTs, 14 studies were selected using the inclusion criteria: seven were designed for the rehabilitative setting and seven for the preventive setting. Three studies of each setting found statistically significant long-term effectiveness.ConclusionsThe high number of studies evaluating health coaching underlines the relevance of this approach. Despite the increasing popularity of health coaching, a research gap exists in regard to its long-term effectiveness.Practice implicationsIt is of utmost importance to consider the sustainability already during planning of health coaching interventions. The involvement of the target group and the setting seems to be a promising strategy.",
author = "Dejonghe, {Lea Anna Lisa} and Jennifer Becker and Ingo Frob{\"o}se and Andrea Schaller",
year = "2017",
doi = "10.1016/j.pec.2017.04.012",
language = "English",
volume = "100",
pages = "1643--1653",
journal = "Patient Education and Counseling",
issn = "0738-3991",
publisher = "Elsevier Ireland Ltd",
number = "9",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Long-term effectiveness of health coaching in rehabilitation and prevention: A systematic review

AU - Dejonghe, Lea Anna Lisa

AU - Becker, Jennifer

AU - Froböse, Ingo

AU - Schaller, Andrea

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - ObjectiveThis systematic review aims to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of health coaching interventions in rehabilitation and prevention.MethodsDatabases and a manual search were used to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in English through to June 2015. Studies were included if: (1) the target population were people of employment age, (2) the intervention addressed either people suffering from a diagnosed disease or healthy people, (3) the intervention included health coaching to influence health-related outcomes and/or processes and (4) the study had a follow-up of at least 24 weeks after the end of the intervention period.ResultsOut of 90 RCTs, 14 studies were selected using the inclusion criteria: seven were designed for the rehabilitative setting and seven for the preventive setting. Three studies of each setting found statistically significant long-term effectiveness.ConclusionsThe high number of studies evaluating health coaching underlines the relevance of this approach. Despite the increasing popularity of health coaching, a research gap exists in regard to its long-term effectiveness.Practice implicationsIt is of utmost importance to consider the sustainability already during planning of health coaching interventions. The involvement of the target group and the setting seems to be a promising strategy.

AB - ObjectiveThis systematic review aims to evaluate the long-term effectiveness of health coaching interventions in rehabilitation and prevention.MethodsDatabases and a manual search were used to identify randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in English through to June 2015. Studies were included if: (1) the target population were people of employment age, (2) the intervention addressed either people suffering from a diagnosed disease or healthy people, (3) the intervention included health coaching to influence health-related outcomes and/or processes and (4) the study had a follow-up of at least 24 weeks after the end of the intervention period.ResultsOut of 90 RCTs, 14 studies were selected using the inclusion criteria: seven were designed for the rehabilitative setting and seven for the preventive setting. Three studies of each setting found statistically significant long-term effectiveness.ConclusionsThe high number of studies evaluating health coaching underlines the relevance of this approach. Despite the increasing popularity of health coaching, a research gap exists in regard to its long-term effectiveness.Practice implicationsIt is of utmost importance to consider the sustainability already during planning of health coaching interventions. The involvement of the target group and the setting seems to be a promising strategy.

U2 - 10.1016/j.pec.2017.04.012

DO - 10.1016/j.pec.2017.04.012

M3 - Journal articles

VL - 100

SP - 1643

EP - 1653

JO - Patient Education and Counseling

JF - Patient Education and Counseling

SN - 0738-3991

IS - 9

ER -

ID: 2999307