Medial shoe-ground pressure and specific running injuries: a 1-year prospective cohort study

Research output: Contribution to journalJournal articlesTransferpeer-review

Authors

  • René B .K. Brund
  • Sten Rasmussen
  • Rasmus O. Nielsen
  • Uwe G. Kersting
  • Uffe Laessoe
  • Michael Voigt

Research units

Details

Objectives Achilles tendinitis, plantar fasciopathy and medial tibial stress syndrome injuries (APM-injuries) account for approximately 25% of the total number of running injuries amongst recreational runners. Reports on the association between static foot pronation and APM-injuries are contradictory. Possibly, dynamic measures of pronation may display a stronger relationship with the risk of APM-injuries. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate if running distance until the first APM-injury was dependent on the foot balance during stance phase in recreational male runners. Design Prospective cohort study. Methods Foot balance for both feet was measured during treadmill running at the fastest possible 5000-m running pace in 79 healthy recreational male runners. Foot balance was calculated by dividing the average of medial pressure with the average of lateral pressure. Foot balance was categorized into those which presented a higher lateral shod pressure (LP) than medial pressure, and those which presented a higher medial shod pressure (MP) than lateral pressure during the stance phase. A time-to-event model was used to compare differences in incidence between foot balance groups. Results Compared with the LP-group (n = 59), the proportion of APM-injuries was greater in the MP-group (n = 99) after 1500 km of running, resulting in a cumulative risk difference of 16%-points (95% CI = 3%-point; 28%-point, p = 0.011). Conclusions Runners displaying a more medial pressure during stance phase at baseline sustained a greater amount of APM-injuries compared to those displaying a lateral shod pressure during stance phase. Prospective studies including a greater amount of runners are needed to confirm this relationship.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Volume20
Issue number9
Pages (from-to)830-834
Number of pages5
ISSN1440-2440
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 01.09.2017

ID: 3690476

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