Organismic integration as a dynamic process: A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution - Published abstract for conference with selection processResearchpeer-review

Standard

Organismic integration as a dynamic process : A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise. / Wasserkampf, Anna; Kleinert, Jens.

International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity : Advancing Behavior Change Science. ed. / International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2015.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution - Published abstract for conference with selection processResearchpeer-review

Harvard

Wasserkampf, A & Kleinert, J 2015, Organismic integration as a dynamic process: A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise. in ISOBNAPA (ed.), International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity : Advancing Behavior Change Science. International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity - Advancing Behavior Change Science, Edinburgh, United Kingdom, 03.06.15.

APA

Wasserkampf, A., & Kleinert, J. (2015). Organismic integration as a dynamic process: A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise. In I. S. O. B. N. A. P. A. (Ed.), International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity : Advancing Behavior Change Science

Vancouver

Wasserkampf A, Kleinert J. Organismic integration as a dynamic process: A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise. In ISOBNAPA, editor, International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity : Advancing Behavior Change Science. 2015

Bibtex

@inbook{8a74d7cae6b14f088c7c95ccea06c29c,
title = "Organismic integration as a dynamic process: A systematic review of empirical studies on change in behavioral regulations in exercise",
abstract = "In facilitating the initiation and adoption of physical activity (PA) behavior, attention should be directed towards the dynamic nature of motivation. However, few attempts have been made in self-determination theory-based research to clarify the process in which subjective reasons for behavior become part of the self (i.e. organismic integration). To provide a more comprehensive investigation of empirical data, this review examines the empirical literature on the dynamic nature of organismic integration theory (OIT) in exercise settings. This systematic review includes 34 prospective and experimental OIT-based studies published up to July 2014, each investigating changes in behavioral regulations in exercise over time, in adults (<18 yrs). Studies focusing on physical education or involving athletes were excluded. Findings are summarized through quantitative analysis of the evidence. With respect to the direction of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, most studies show no significant changes in controlled regulations, with the exception of introjected regulation, which shows some fluctuations over time. Conversely, autonomous regulations increase steadily over time. With respect to the timing of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, results indicate that introjected regulation does not change any further beyond 3 months. Moreover, autonomous regulations show increases from the first few weeks of exercise adoption onwards. Overall, the literature provides good evidence for the dynamic nature of motivation, demonstrating that behavioral regulations in exercise are changeable over time. In support of this, exercise instructors are advised to consider participants{\textquoteright} subjective norms during PA initiation and adoption. Furthermore, as changes in autonomous regulations are observable within a few weeks, intervention effects are evaluable in the early stages of interventions. ",
author = "Anna Wasserkampf and Jens Kleinert",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
editor = "{International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity}",
booktitle = "International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity",
note = "International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity - Advancing Behavior Change Science ; Conference date: 03-06-2015 Through 06-06-2015",

}

RIS

TY - CHAP

T1 - Organismic integration as a dynamic process

T2 - International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity - Advancing Behavior Change Science

AU - Wasserkampf, Anna

AU - Kleinert, Jens

N1 - Conference code: 14

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - In facilitating the initiation and adoption of physical activity (PA) behavior, attention should be directed towards the dynamic nature of motivation. However, few attempts have been made in self-determination theory-based research to clarify the process in which subjective reasons for behavior become part of the self (i.e. organismic integration). To provide a more comprehensive investigation of empirical data, this review examines the empirical literature on the dynamic nature of organismic integration theory (OIT) in exercise settings. This systematic review includes 34 prospective and experimental OIT-based studies published up to July 2014, each investigating changes in behavioral regulations in exercise over time, in adults (<18 yrs). Studies focusing on physical education or involving athletes were excluded. Findings are summarized through quantitative analysis of the evidence. With respect to the direction of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, most studies show no significant changes in controlled regulations, with the exception of introjected regulation, which shows some fluctuations over time. Conversely, autonomous regulations increase steadily over time. With respect to the timing of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, results indicate that introjected regulation does not change any further beyond 3 months. Moreover, autonomous regulations show increases from the first few weeks of exercise adoption onwards. Overall, the literature provides good evidence for the dynamic nature of motivation, demonstrating that behavioral regulations in exercise are changeable over time. In support of this, exercise instructors are advised to consider participants’ subjective norms during PA initiation and adoption. Furthermore, as changes in autonomous regulations are observable within a few weeks, intervention effects are evaluable in the early stages of interventions.

AB - In facilitating the initiation and adoption of physical activity (PA) behavior, attention should be directed towards the dynamic nature of motivation. However, few attempts have been made in self-determination theory-based research to clarify the process in which subjective reasons for behavior become part of the self (i.e. organismic integration). To provide a more comprehensive investigation of empirical data, this review examines the empirical literature on the dynamic nature of organismic integration theory (OIT) in exercise settings. This systematic review includes 34 prospective and experimental OIT-based studies published up to July 2014, each investigating changes in behavioral regulations in exercise over time, in adults (<18 yrs). Studies focusing on physical education or involving athletes were excluded. Findings are summarized through quantitative analysis of the evidence. With respect to the direction of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, most studies show no significant changes in controlled regulations, with the exception of introjected regulation, which shows some fluctuations over time. Conversely, autonomous regulations increase steadily over time. With respect to the timing of change in the forms of behavioral regulations, results indicate that introjected regulation does not change any further beyond 3 months. Moreover, autonomous regulations show increases from the first few weeks of exercise adoption onwards. Overall, the literature provides good evidence for the dynamic nature of motivation, demonstrating that behavioral regulations in exercise are changeable over time. In support of this, exercise instructors are advised to consider participants’ subjective norms during PA initiation and adoption. Furthermore, as changes in autonomous regulations are observable within a few weeks, intervention effects are evaluable in the early stages of interventions.

M3 - Conference contribution - Published abstract for conference with selection process

BT - International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

A2 - , International Society of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity

Y2 - 3 June 2015 through 6 June 2015

ER -

ID: 920387