Sex, drugs and science: the IOC’s and IAAF’s attempts to control fairness in sport

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Sex, drugs and science : the IOC’s and IAAF’s attempts to control fairness in sport. / Krieger, Jörg; Parks Pieper, Lindsay; Ritchie, Ian.

In: Sport in Society (online), 2018.

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@article{e41d93e47ce540379db2bc1f39262d08,
title = "Sex, drugs and science: the IOC{\textquoteright}s and IAAF{\textquoteright}s attempts to control fairness in sport",
abstract = "This paper traces the history of two important policies in sport: rules against drugs and {\textquoteleft}ambiguous{\textquoteright} athletes in women{\textquoteright}s events. We identify three phases in the work of the International Olympic Committee{\textquoteright}s and International Amateur Athletic Federation{\textquoteright}s medical committees: (1) from the mid-1960s to the 1970s, the medical grounding of the committees and the members{\textquoteright} worldviews encouraged the groups to enlist scientific techniques to solve drug use and sex ambiguity issues; (2) from the 1970s to the 1980s, administrative confusion underscored both committees, but scientific personnel gained legitimacy and furthered their own agendas; and (3) from the 1980s to the mid-1980s, the seeds of diversion in sex and drug tests were sown. The central finding of this study is that the stakeholders who shaped anti-doping and sex testing policies took for granted concerns regarding ethics and instead increasingly relied upon medical, scientific, and technical practices to define and control fairness in sport.",
author = "J{\"o}rg Krieger and {Parks Pieper}, Lindsay and Ian Ritchie",
note = "Online: 19.02.2018",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/17430437.2018.1435004",
language = "English",
journal = "Sport in Society",
issn = "1743-0437",
publisher = "Routledge",

}

RIS

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sex, drugs and science

T2 - the IOC’s and IAAF’s attempts to control fairness in sport

AU - Krieger, Jörg

AU - Parks Pieper, Lindsay

AU - Ritchie, Ian

N1 - Online: 19.02.2018

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - This paper traces the history of two important policies in sport: rules against drugs and ‘ambiguous’ athletes in women’s events. We identify three phases in the work of the International Olympic Committee’s and International Amateur Athletic Federation’s medical committees: (1) from the mid-1960s to the 1970s, the medical grounding of the committees and the members’ worldviews encouraged the groups to enlist scientific techniques to solve drug use and sex ambiguity issues; (2) from the 1970s to the 1980s, administrative confusion underscored both committees, but scientific personnel gained legitimacy and furthered their own agendas; and (3) from the 1980s to the mid-1980s, the seeds of diversion in sex and drug tests were sown. The central finding of this study is that the stakeholders who shaped anti-doping and sex testing policies took for granted concerns regarding ethics and instead increasingly relied upon medical, scientific, and technical practices to define and control fairness in sport.

AB - This paper traces the history of two important policies in sport: rules against drugs and ‘ambiguous’ athletes in women’s events. We identify three phases in the work of the International Olympic Committee’s and International Amateur Athletic Federation’s medical committees: (1) from the mid-1960s to the 1970s, the medical grounding of the committees and the members’ worldviews encouraged the groups to enlist scientific techniques to solve drug use and sex ambiguity issues; (2) from the 1970s to the 1980s, administrative confusion underscored both committees, but scientific personnel gained legitimacy and furthered their own agendas; and (3) from the 1980s to the mid-1980s, the seeds of diversion in sex and drug tests were sown. The central finding of this study is that the stakeholders who shaped anti-doping and sex testing policies took for granted concerns regarding ethics and instead increasingly relied upon medical, scientific, and technical practices to define and control fairness in sport.

U2 - 10.1080/17430437.2018.1435004

DO - 10.1080/17430437.2018.1435004

M3 - Journal articles

JO - Sport in Society

JF - Sport in Society

SN - 1743-0437

ER -

ID: 3231274